Principles Of Effective Communication

Copy begins not as a script but as ideas in the mind of a writer—an ad agency copywriter, a newswriter, a documentary scriptwriter, a station sales representative, or some other specialist in broadcast writing.

The ability to communicate these words effectively is the art of announcing.

Radio communicates by spoken and sung language, instrumental music, and sound effects. Television has a vital visual component. The audio aspects of television are also important in conveying messages. As a professional announcer; you can make messages more effective than they would be if communicated only in writing. Beyond the basic level of accurate reading and pronunciation, you can convey an emotion appropriate to your copy—enthusiasm, seriousness, or humor—and in doing so provide meaning for your listeners. You can clarify a message's meaning by communicating the relative importance of its various parts. In short, you can present the material in its most persuasive and readily understandable form.

Oral communication, however, loses its effect when announcers fail to present their material clearly and with conviction. Too many professional announcers merely read the words before them, and consider themselves successful if they don't stumble over the words. A word is a symbol of an idea. If the idea isn't clear to an announcer, or if it isn't read compellingly, the chances are slight that the announcer will transmit the idea clearly to his or her listeners. Announcers are paid to be effective. To do this they must develop oral reading skills that are more than just adequate.

Make a point of listening to announcers, such as music station radio personalities, radio and television newscasters, and radio and television documentary narrators. Study the announcers' deliveries and decide for yourself which announcers are true communicators. You'll discover that you listen closely to those who communicate well, and mentally tune out those who do not. Few people think consciously about the communicative ability of announcers, but we're all certainly affected by it. We find ourselves listening to those announcers who are best able to help us receive and assimilate ideas.

Radio announcers who believe that only their voices matter may attempt to project vitality without using gestures. Such play-acting isn't likely to be convincing. Learn to announce for radio and television as though your listener were sitting nearby. Use your face, hands, and body just as you do in ordinary conversation. Integrating all of the tools of communication—verbal and nonverbal—will help you clarify and intensify your message, even though radio listeners can't see you. Appropriate gesturing for both radio and television is marked by two considerations: honest motivation, and harmony with the importance and the mood of the ideas expressed. Energy is easy to simulate, but unless a speaker is genuinely motivated by the content and purpose of a message, energy usually comes across as phony. Uncalled-for enthusiasm hinders communication. Oversized grins, frowns, and grimaces and sweeping arm movements are seldom appropriate to these intimate media. Good Radio communicates by spoken and sung language, instrumental music, and sound effects. Television has a vital visual component. The audio aspects of television are also important in conveying messages. As a professional announcer, you can make messages more effective than they would be if communicated only in writing. 

Beyond the basic level of accurate reading and pronunciation, you can convey an emotion appropriate to your copy—enthusiasm, seriousness, or humor—and in doing so provide meaning for your listeners. You can clarify a message's meaning by communicating the relative importance of its various parts. In short, you can present the material in its most persuasive and readily understandable form.

Oral communication, however, loses its effect when announcers fail to present their material clearly and with conviction. Too many professional announcers merely read the words before them, and consider themselves successful if they don't stumble over the words. A word is a symbol of an idea. If the idea isn't clear to an announcer, or if it isn't read compellingly, the chances are slight that the announcer will transmit the idea clearly to his or her listeners. Announcers are paid to be effective. To do this they must develop oral reading skills that are more than just adequate.

Make a point of listening to announcers, such as music station radio personalities, radio and television newscasters, and radio and television documentary narrators. Study the announcers' deliveries and decide for yourself which announcers are true communicators. You'll discover that you listen closely to those who communicate well, and mentally tune out those who do not. Few people think consciously about the communicative ability of announcers, but we're all certainly affected by it. We find ourselves listening to those announcers who are best able to help us receive and assimilate ideas.

Radio announcers who believe that only their voices matter may attempt to project vitality without using gestures. Such play-acting isn't likely to be convincing. Learn to announce for radio and television as though your listener were sitting nearby. Use your face, hands, and body just as you do in ordinary conversation. Integrating all of the tools of communication—verbal and nonverbal—will help you clarify and intensify your message, even though radio listeners can't see you. Appropriate gesturing for both radio and television is marked by two considerations: honest motivation, and harmony with the importance and the mood of the ideas expressed. Energy is easy to simulate, but unless a speaker is genuinely motivated by the content and purpose of a message, energy usually comes across as phony. Uncalled-for enthusiasm hinders communication. Oversized grins, frowns, and grimaces and sweeping arm movements are seldom appropriate to these intimate media. Good communication occurs when the listener or viewer receives an undistorted and meaningful impression of the ideas of the writer with appropriate verbal and nonverbal emphasis given to each part of the message.

Audition performances by professional announcers may be found on the Internet and played through your computer's speakers. Visit www.provoice.com and click on "Talent"